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Behind the article: what it takes to create a journalism story

February 12, 2020

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Behind the article: what it takes to create a journalism story

Aiden Preston

In journalism we get graded on the stories we write. They are due every other Friday, giving us two weeks to write them and are worth 50 points each. Our teacher Kathryn Phillips goes over our stories with us, changes them and then we send them to Liz Phillips and Evie Linck to go in the paper and on the Link website. That might seem easy but making a story can actually be quite difficult.

There are many stages to making a story. First you have to find a story idea, which can be very hard. We have to make sure that there is enough information for the story and that it is something students will want to read. This in itself is a challenge because it is hard to find relevant things that are happening that can pertain to sixth, seventh, and eighth graders’ interests. For me finding a good idea normally takes the first day or two.

After we have our story ideas, we go in a few directions. If you’re doing a narrative story, you can just start writing about the experience. A more factual story requires research and interviews. Finally, an opinion story can be just your own point of view or interview others to get their perspectives on the issue.There are certain opinion stories that do require you to do some research. 

Once we have our idea and have done some research, it is time for us to start actually writing. Narratives are a lot like an essay. Opinions stories can be written from a first person point of view like narratives, or they can be questions with research. Narratives are probably the easiest because you are just writing about a past experience and the words can just come to you.

“Your stories must reflect ten hours of work, guys,” says Mrs. Phillips daily, reminding us of the effort we must put into our stories so that we can put a good newspaper out and get good grades. The process of making stories really does take a lot of time and hard work, so when it’s the Thursday before the deadline and our stories are not done we are working to get them in on time. 

So this is journalism.

In journalism we get graded on the stories we write. They are due every other Friday, giving us two weeks to write them and are worth 50 points each. Our teacher Kathryn Phillips goes over our stories with us, changes them and then we send them to Liz Phillips and Evie Linck to go in the paper and on the Link website. That might seem easy but making a story can actually be quite difficult.

There are many stages to making a story. First you have to find a story idea, which can be very hard. We have to make sure that there is enough information for the story and that it is something students will want to read. This in itself is a challenge because it is hard to find relevant things that are happening that can pertain to sixth, seventh, and eighth graders’ interests. For me finding a good idea normally takes the first day or two. 

After we have our story ideas, we go in a few directions. If you’re doing a narrative story, you can just start writing about the experience. A more factual story requires research and interviews. Finally, an opinion story can be just your own point of view or interview others to get their perspectives on the issue.There are certain opinion stories that do require you to do some research. 

Once we have our idea and have done some research, it is time for us to start actually writing. Narratives are a lot like an essay. Opinions stories can be written from a first person point of view like narratives, or they can be questions with research. Narratives are probably the easiest because you are just writing about a past experience and the words can just come to you.

“Your stories must reflect ten hours of work, guys,” says Mrs. Phillips daily, reminding us of the effort we must put into our stories so that we can put a good newspaper out and get good grades. The process of making stories really does take a lot of time and hard work, so when it’s the Thursday before the deadline and our stories are not done we are working to get them in on time. 

So this is journalism.

We think, we write, we check, we finalize, we repeat.”

 

The class is honestly amazing and requires a very productive mindset that the EMS press staff come prepared with.

About the Contributor
Aiden Preston, Journalism Staff

Click here to see all of the stories our writer, Aiden Preston, has written!

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