Looking Closer at Sexism

Photo+Courtesy+of%3A+Mallory+Swope
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Looking Closer at Sexism

Photo Courtesy of: Mallory Swope

Photo Courtesy of: Mallory Swope

Photo Courtesy of: Mallory Swope

Photo Courtesy of: Mallory Swope

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“Sandwiches don’t make themselves; and that’s why God created women.”

This was a comment a kid who rides my bus made one day. He thought he was being funny, but no. It was NOT funny. He chose to sit in the wrong seat that day. I made eye contact with my friend, and in a split second, we were both out of our seats screaming at him. Though the screams were hard to understand, they had the same message.

Lois Wyse, a famous author and columnist, once said “Men are taught to apologize for their weaknesses, women for their strengths.” This brings us to the first lesson.

Lesson number one: girls are just as equal as boys. I hate hearing from boys, “Wow, I can’t believe you could do that. That seems impossible for a girl to do.” There shouldn’t be anything shocking about a girl being able to do a “man’s job” or do something that “only a man can do.” A girl is just as capable of doing physical labor as a boy is. Whether this is moving heavy furniture or doing the dirty work, it doesn’t matter. Boys are equals to girls – not superiors.

Eighth grader Jessica Sarin joined East’s weights and conditioning class for the first time this year.

“I thought this semester was going to be tragic,” she said. “I was worried that since the class is mainly boys they would judge me because I was different from them.”

Lesson number two: girls can be just as strong as boys — both mentally and physically. Using the weights and conditioning class as an example, it’s okay if a girl can bench more than a boy. Everyone’s body is different, so yeah, a girl who is naturally very muscular might be able to bench more than a boy who is very lanky and scrawny, but that’s okay. Going back to lesson number one, girls are equal to boys.

Venturing into the depths of the real world – as opposed to middle school – we come to lesson number three. The gender pay gap is real. Even though the Equal Pay Act was passed more than 50 years ago, women still only make 79 cents to a man’s dollar. A woman can work just as hard as a man, or even twice as hard, but doesn’t get the pay she deserves.

“There’s no point for the government to go out of their way to pay a woman 20 percent less than a man because she isn’t a man,” said Sarin.

Now, let’s talk about lesson number four: girls are not objects. Oh my lord, girls have feelings. What a shocker. Considering this, girls should NOT be subject to name calling and mocking. Girls are entitled to just as much respect and honor as any man is. But that’s not reality. The reality of our world in 2017 – though it is better than it was in the 1950’s – is still sexist. Men still refer to their wives as their property and believe they “wear the pants” in the relationship. Not cool.

Lesson number five is my personal favorite. Finding clothes that aren’t revealing is hard. I prefer to wear more modest clothing that doesn’t reveal much, but that’s just me. When I go to the mall looking for clothes that I like and are comfortable, it takes forever because of today’s style. A girl who is  wearing short shorts might not be doing so by choice. This problem goes back to name calling. A lot of the time as I am walking through the hallways, I will hear something along the lines of “Her shirt was too low cut,” or  “Those shorts are too showy.” It is no one’s place to judge anyone, whether it’s a girl or not, by the clothes he or she wears on their back.

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